How would you like to be remembered?

As someone who never gave up.

josebambi:

saw one of these things for the USA. decided we needed an english version.

How Meditation Can Help Inmates - Paul Rosenfeld - The Atlantic:

In this short film from Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee we go inside the Rhode Island correctional facility, where we are introduced to Fleet Maull and the inmates who enroll in his Prison Mindfulness Institute. The film makes the case for prison serving the function of reformation and not simply incarceration.
The Myth Of Multitasking : NPR

Clifford Nass, a psychology professor at Stanford University, says today’s nonstop multitasking actually wastes more time than it saves—and he says there’s evidence it may be killing our concentration and creativity too.


It’s extraordinary how this structure has resonated deeply with people. I think people want to get back into the forest.

— Tye Farrow, senior partner at Farrow Partnership Architects.
Via Adele Peters, These Amazing Hanging Hotel Rooms Let Guests Camp In Trees | Co.Exist | ideas impact

It’s extraordinary how this structure has resonated deeply with people. I think people want to get back into the forest.

— Tye Farrow, senior partner at Farrow Partnership Architects.

Via Adele Peters, These Amazing Hanging Hotel Rooms Let Guests Camp In Trees | Co.Exist | ideas impact

It’s like Schopenhauer said, people tend to believe that adversity is this extraordinary thing in humanity; adversity is the norm. It is extraordinary when you don’t experience adversity. Adversity shapes who you are and how you deal with life.
How did Pack Up Your Troubles become the viral hit of WW1? — BBC

This is the story of a song that travelled the world and became one of the most iconic songs of World War One. Almost 100 years after it was written, the tune and lyrics remain with us long after the guns of World War One have fallen silent.

These Photos Of Rats Holding Teddy Bears Will Make You Kinda Love Rats | Co.Design | business design
If you suffer from musophobia—the fear of rats and mice—these photographs of pet rats cuddling miniature teddy bears might be a better cure than years of exposure therapy.
—ELLEN VAN DEELEN
In Italy, true and fictional crime stories blur into one another and, as Luigi Pirandello warned almost a century ago, in this land of illusionism you could go mad searching for the missing truth.
To be fair, Perugia, where the murder and early trials took place, is a small university town and seemed to lack the kinds of hot-shot lawyers and judges that might be involved in a similarly important case in a larger city. […]
“Nobody here’s good at their job,” Frank Sfarzo, a local blogger who has followed the trial more obsessively than anyone, told Rolling Stone. “If they were, they wouldn’t be in Perugia.”
There is a deep desire that the writer’s life story be as exciting as the books themselves. I don’t know whether this comes out of a lack of imagination on the part of readers, our out of a yearning for the novels’ spell to continue past the final page. Probably some measure of both.
A group of researchers at the Center for Applied Criminology at Birmingham City University in the U.K. has recently analyzed newspaper articles, court records, and a series of “off-the-record” interviews with informants “who have, or who had, direct knowledge of contract killings” in order to construct what they term a “typology” of British hitmen.
From a psychological standpoint, in order to achieve a great breakthrough, you must be able to suspend disbelief indefinitely. The technology startup world is where brilliant people come to imagine the impossible.
You can’t ruin a painting’s mystique through technical analysis," Olson says. "It still has the same emotional impact. We are just separating the real from the unreal.