“And often it’s that very first place to start—to really take advantage of and be protected by the legal system—that even middle-class people in the civilian world can’t afford.”
“Secondly, an artificially-induced feeling of crappiness is, one would think, completely different to the multi-layered and highly personal reasons one might turn to comfort food in regular life – a specific response to a specific and complicated psychological state that it is almost impossible to recreate in lab conditions.

… When you are threatened, you retreat in your mind to places of happiness. Comfort food is merely an aide-mémoire that uses more than one of your senses.

Emma BrockesScience says there’s no such thing as ‘comfort food’. We all beg to differ | Comment is free | theguardian.com
“My old BlackBerry was becoming unreliable, so I got a Samsung Galaxy or something like that. I got it because my wife already had one and could answer some of my questions. And all I wanted was for somebody I knew well to have already suffered so I wouldn’t have to suffer.”
— Barry Schwartz, Little Boxes of Decision Avoidance : The New Yorker by Atossa Araxia Abrahamian
“Ordinarily, poetry does seem to be the opposite of show business, and we probably just prefer our poets not to be celebrities in that particular way, … It doesn’t sit well with us, and it’s very hard to explain that. Money is felt to be contaminating and to be antithetical to the values that we expect from poetry and literature and art.”
— Don Share, Chicago-based editor of Poetry magazine and poet, in: BBC News - Is it possible to be a millionaire poet? by William Kremer

Luigi Di Cicco was the son of a mafia boss, and most people expected him to follow in his father’s footsteps. He could easily have fallen into a life of money, crime, violence, jail - but he broke free.

In order to cut costs further, I announced our first ever lay-offs. At the end of May 2014, I’m cutting half our moderation staff to make up for revenue shortfalls. Starting June 1st, we’ll continue operating as normal, but with less staff with more of my time will be devoted to day to day moderation on the site.


Overall, moderation conforms to an 80-20 rule where with the right approach and moderateeffort you can get a very good community site, but going the extra mile takes multiples of effort to make small gains. I feel in the past we were very close to getting the best possible community site we could because we had so many resources available to us, and as we scale back the goal is to maintain that high quality as much as possible with the hope being the overall decrease won’t be so much as to drastically change the community.

Today, the story of one little thing that has radically changed what we know about humanity’s humble beginnings and the kinds of creatures that were out to get us way back when.
The Skull - Radiolab

George R.R. Martin Writes on a DOS-Based Word Processor From the 1980s

4.0 was the second WordStar version to work on DOS, but was a rewrite of 3.0, which had been directly ported to DOS from CP/M. Martin says that to this day it fulfills his every writing need.

I actually like it. It does everything I want a word processing program to do and it doesn’t do anything else.
George R.R. Martin Writes on a DOS-Based Word Processor From the 1980s —Slate [via Cal Newport: Should We Work Like Novelists?]
“Now, if you can’t find a book that is even remotely acceptable to you, then you have to write your own. That’s how books get written. (Well, actually, it’s how books get started; they get finished because your third child is on the way, and you have no money to pay the rent.)”
— Robert T. Morrison, The Lecture System in Teaching Science. From: Proceedings of the Chicago Conferences on Liberal Education, Number 1, Undergraduate Education in Chemistry and Physics (edited by Marian R. Rice). The College Center for Curricular Thought: The University of Chicago, (October 18-19, 1986). A Student’s Approach to the Second Law and Entropy
“Today students are almost as wedded to the lecture system as the teachers are. They come to college expecting lectures and, come what may, they’re going to take notes. Well, it beats thinking, doesn’t it? You have to be serious about the Gutenberg Method and you have to be seen to be serious about it. I’ve had to pry pencils out of hot little hands.”
— Robert T. Morrison, The Lecture System in Teaching Science. From: Proceedings of the Chicago Conferences on Liberal Education, Number 1, Undergraduate Education in Chemistry and Physics (edited by Marian R. Rice). The College Center for Curricular Thought: The University of Chicago, (October 18-19, 1986). A Student’s Approach to the Second Law and Entropy